Why Our Bodies Are Prone to Addiction

According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), addiction is a chronic, relapsing brain disease characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences. Chronic being the key term. Like other chronic diseases, addiction can be treated and maintained but it cannot be cured. Why?

The Science Behind Addiction

Our bodies are prone to addiction. Our body wants us to feel happy. So, in turn, we naturally seek avenues to which we will have the greatest success. Sometimes that creates a problem. Ridgeview Ranch knows how to help you solve it. Call today for a Confidential & Complimentary Assessment with one of our Recovery Specialists.

Excessive drinking and drug use alter the way our brain functions, attacking our cognitive abilities and capacity for pleasure. In other words…Our bodies are prone to addiction. Have you ever heard of a chemical substance called dopamine? It’s our brain’s way of rewarding us for having fun. We release dopamine when we’re eating, exercising, laughing…and even more so when we’re consuming drugs or alcohol. No wonder the nightlife here in Southern California is so popular! Our body wants us to feel happy. So, in turn, we naturally seek avenues to which we will have the greatest success.

Chronic Diseases Require Ongoing Treatment

If you find yourself inhibited by alcohol, opiates or any other drugs, seek addiction treatment. Trying to recover all on your own is hard and often unsuccessful. Chronic diseases require constant control and treatment. And unfortunately, during a withdrawal, your brain just doesn’t function at its 100% best.

At Ridgeview Ranch, we recognize how hard it is to recover from addiction. We know the effects it has on your body and mind and we work diligently to overcome these obstacles with you. Our individualized treatment plans are customized to fit each person’s needs, no matter how critical they may be, and target mental, physical and spiritual development to retrain your brain and reactions to drug use.

Southern California has plenty of distractions that can deter you from seeking the addiction treatment you need to heal. Keep in mind, our bodies are constantly seeking happiness and the release of dopamine in our brains. That’s just the nature of our biology. However, if you lack the control to manage destructive impulses such as drug and alcohol consumption and bombard your mind with substances it can’t control, you may lead yourself down a path you don’t want to be on.

Balancing Life and Happiness

In addiction treatment, we’ll teach you how to manage your addiction and find balance in everyday life. Recent studies have shown that stress and cognitive pressure greatly impact the ability to avoid tempting situations, like walking past a bar or designated smoking area. At Ridgeview Ranch, we believe that when it comes to beating addiction, managing stress and physical conditioning will put you back on the path to healthy living. We focus on the “Whole Person” and the characteristics that make each individual unique. Our programs incorporate calming activities such as art, music, and yoga to better treat the underlying behaviors that cause addiction and ensure a successful path to recovery.

If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol or substance abuse, please If you or a loved one is struggling with alcohol or substance abuse, please Contact Ridgeview Ranch at (877) 526-7706 for a Confidential & Complimentary Assessment with one of our Recovery Specialists. Calls are answered 24 hours a day, every day. We’ve helped so many people overcome addiction. Let us help you too! Calls are answered 24 hours a day, every day. We’ve helped so many people overcome addiction. Let us help you too!

The Problems at the Core of the Opioid Crisis

Our country has been battling an opioid addiction crisis for nearly 30 years. In the early 1990s, public officials had some justification in blaming patient-prescribed pills as the source of the problem. During that time, physicians increased the number of prescriptions to compensate for undertreatment of pain in patients, and in 1996 Oxycontin was released and vigorously marketed to doctors. Since then, lawmakers and doctors have been trying to find the right balance of regulation and usage among patients, not to mention issues with the drugs finding their way into black markets.

It’s clearer to see in retrospect that policymakers have misjudged possible solutions to the problem by overestimating the patient risk in using prescription drugs. At the same time, they have done very little to encourage and assist clinicians in identifying patients who would be more vulnerable to develop an addiction.

It’s clearer to see in retrospect that policymakers have misjudged possible solutions to the problem by overestimating the patient risk in using prescription drugs. At the same time, they have done very little to encourage and assist clinicians in identifying patients who would be more vulnerable to develop an addiction. In general, they regard drops in opioid prescriptions as a good thing, while in reality, tighter restrictions often prevent many non-addicted patients from getting the opiates they need.

Further clouding the issue is the fact that patients who abuse their pills are often not new to drug use. In the federal government’s 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, it was revealed that more than three-fourths of opioid misusers had previously used non-prescribed benzodiazepines like Valium or Xanax as well as inhalants. Instead of being innocent parties who end up with addiction after being given a prescription, most patients with opioid addiction already have an extensive history of drug use.

Addiction is also a dynamic process. It isn’t something that can be traced to one specific action in one specific moment in time—it usually runs much deeper than, “if only I hadn’t taken that one pill, things would be okay.” Addiction can usually be traced to stressors unique to each individual, such as depression, anxiety, or a seemingly endless variety of concerns that could weigh heavily on one’s thoughts and feelings—being overweight, feeling stuck and frustrated in a job, being able to “come out” to one’s family, etc. When a drug triggers a bodily response that reduces the impact of those stressors, it becomes a seductive alternative to coping with them. This isn’t to say addiction is inevitable at that point, but it’s an indication that the risk is much higher for these individuals.

The problems at the core of the opioid crisis go far beyond the pills themselves. They are much more likely to gain addictive power over people who feel that their use is relieving an inner pain or satisfying an unmet need. So while it has been important to pay attention to the regulation of prescriptions, it is just as important to recognize patients who could be at a greater risk to develop a dependency. If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction to opioids, other substances, or alcohol, Contact Ridgeview Ranch (877-526-7706) to speak with one of our clinical professionals about seeking treatment.